• GRC Agency Advocacy

    Health Research and Education

    The Health Research and Education Task Force was established in January 2010 with two goals. First, to build on existing relationships with the leaders of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), to guide their development of programs and funding mechanisms targeting non-research intensive institutions. Simultaneously, the task force is creating a culture of awareness on GRC campuses about the research requirements, application development skills, networking, and peer review knowledge that lead to a record of successful funding requests.

    GRC leaders worked closely with the NIH director’s office and extramural research office during the overhaul of the NIH peer review process. The task force has also begun discussions with AHRQ leadership to define specific strategies to increase both AHRQ’s and NIH’s support for excellent biomedical and behavioral research and health-related workforce development conducted by non-research intensive institutions. The task force also has given detailed input into NIH’s examination of institutional capacity building.

    Current task force priorities include working with NIH on a pipeline program involving AASCU institutions and community college partners, conducting additional NIH applicant training, developing mentoring partnerships, and launching a program to foster equipment sharing between teaching-intensive institutions and research-intensive institutions.

    The Health Research and Education Task Force was established in January 2010 with two goals. First, to build on existing relationships with the leaders of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), to guide their development of programs and funding mechanisms targeting non-research intensive institutions. Simultaneously, the task force is creating a culture of awareness on GRC campuses about the research requirements, application development skills, networking, and peer review knowledge that lead to a record of successful funding requests.

    GRC leaders worked closely with the NIH director’s office and extramural research office during the overhaul of the NIH peer review process. The task force has also begun discussions with AHRQ leadership to define specific strategies to increase both AHRQ’s and NIH’s support for excellent biomedical and behavioral research and health-related workforce development conducted by non-research intensive institutions. The task force also has given detailed input into NIH’s examination of institutional capacity building.

    Current task force priorities include working with NIH on a pipeline program involving AASCU institutions and community college partners, conducting additional NIH applicant training, developing mentoring partnerships, and launching a program to foster equipment sharing between teaching-intensive institutions and research-intensive institutions.