COAS E105 (K004) Environmental Science

ENG W131 (K039) Elementary Composition 1

Tuesday, Thursday: 9:00 A.M - 11:45 A.M.

 

Instructors:

       Ann Cameron (Office: KE312; Office phone: 765-455-9312; email: acameron@iuk.edu)

       Marcia L. Gillette (Office: KO222; Office phone: 765-455-9369; email: mgillett@iuk.edu)

       Kathy Parkison (Office: KO174N; Office phone: 765-455-9462; email: kparkiso@iuk.edu)

 

Instructors’ Office Hours:

       Generally, before and after class and by appointment.

 

Texts (all required):

       E.D. Enger and B.F. Smith, Environmental Science, Eighth Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2001.

       Toby Fulwiler and Alan R. Hayakawa, The Blair Handbook, Third Edition. Prentice Hall 2000.

 

Note:

On occasion, we will be doing calculations. Using a calculator (and bringing it to class) will be helpful. You will also need a ruler, calibrated in centimeters, for one of the laboratory experiments.

 

Prerequisite:

You must have placed into ENG W131.

 

 

 

 

 

The Course:

 

In E105 Environmental Science, we will explore the complex interrelationships among the physical, biological, chemical, cultural, economic, and political forces at work in making up the environment we live in. All of the decisions we make as human beings have an impact upon the quality and integrity of the world around us. You will have the opportunity to investigate, discuss, and write about some of these issues in a unique classroom setting. As part of a learning community that includes a team of faculty members with diverse academic backgrounds, you will study environmental science through the perspectives of several disciplines and in multiple ways. You will study the scientific method and process, learn how questions concerning the environment affect decision-making in politics and business, share your experiences with others through discussion and debate, and write a variety of papers in order to reinforce your learning and express your ideas. Learning experiences will encompass laboratory work, lectures, small group work, role playing and problem solving activities, writing workshops, library visits, and a debate.

 

In the context of environmental issues, you will develop your writing skills, meeting the English Department’s W131 required outcomes. These outcomes begin with the practice of simple description and narration and work through the handling of evidence, argument, and persuasion. What better way is there to conduct this multidisciplinary exploration than through writing and speaking about the issues?

 

The block scheduling of the class will allow for flexibility in course activities. On some days, we will work as an entire group; on others, we will divide into our recitation sections for small-group work. We will use a discussion format in class so we can take advantage of the expertise and wealth of experiences each of us brings to this endeavor. To optimize our learning, it is critical that each of you must actively (verbally) participate in group discussions and other activities. To be productive, you must come prepared to each class. The best preparation you can make is to read the assigned material before we discuss it in class. Depending upon your prior experiences, some of the subject matter may seem unclear upon first reading. Nevertheless, having read it before class will give you a chance to begin thinking about it, and you will be prepared to increase your understanding as we tackle it in class.

 

Outcomes:

We are committed to helping you develop abilities that will enable you to be successful in college and in your post-college endeavors. To accomplish this we have identified eight primary Outcomes, and a three-tiered (Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3) sequence of abilities associated with each Outcome.

 

In E105/W131, we will address all eight Outcomes to varying degrees, but our assessment activities will focus on three: Writing, Speaking, and Analytical Skills. We will use in-class and out-of-class activities to help you develop these abilities, and clearly identify those outcomes being assessed by each graded assignment. By the end of our semester together in E105/W131, we anticipate that you will have achieved a minimum of a Level 1 ability in each of the addressed areas. To demonstrate your achievement of some of these abilities, you will engage in a variety of assignments, including 2 laboratory experiments, 10 quizzes, 4 papers (2-3 pages each), 5 role-play activities, a computer exercise, miscellaneous short assignments, a debate, and 3 examinations. We will describe and discuss our method for relating your achievement on these assessment activities to a course grade.

 

 

Students will receive separate grades for each component of the 6-hour course. In order to pass W131 (English Composition), you must earn a grade of C or better (C- is not a passing grade). in order to pass E105 (Environmental Science), you must earn a grade of D or better. We will review the details of grading during class, so you can ask questions and get clarification. The guidelines below explain the grading scales and weighting of the assignments in both parts of the course.

 

Grading Policies for the English Composition Component, W131

 

Most of the W131 grade will be based upon the four essays required throughout the semester.

 

Essay #1 (Personal Experience Essay, draft, self-assessment)                           20%    

       Essay #2 (Habitat Essay, thesis/outline/intro, draft, self-assessment)                           20%

       Essay #3 (Problem Analysis Essay, thesisl/outline/intro, draft, self-assessment)            20%    

       Essay #4 (Position Paper with Debate)                                                                                   30%

       Miscellaneous (summaries, quizzes, critique, exercises, attendance, etc.)                 10%                                                                                                                                         100%

 


Major assignments will be graded on a 4.0 scale (4.0 = A). Late papers will receive grade deductions of one full point per school day that the paper is late. Papers may be turned in any time on the day they are due. Oftentimes students will be required to turn in prewriting and drafts with the completed essay. These requirements will be explained in class and in writing. Students should turn in two copies of each paper assignment. One copy will be graded, and the other will be kept in the student’s file as a record of the work completed. 

 

 

Grading Policies for the Environmental Science Component, E105

 

Student grades for E105 will be determined by their performance on the various Environmental Science activities.

 

The best 7 of 10 Environmental Science quizzes, each worth 10 points  =   70 points

Pre-Laboratory Assignments from 2 experiments, each worth 10 points  =   20 points

Calculations and Post-Laboratory Questions, and Summary Statement
              from 2 experiments, each worth 10 points                                                  =   60 points

Problem Solving Activities, worth a total of 50 points                                             =   50 points

Attendance and active participation in class                                                   =   50 points

Three Environmental Science examinations, each worth 100 points                   = 300 points

                                                                                                 Total possible points = 550 points

 

We will give grades ranging from A+ to F, based upon the following percentages:

 

88% – 100%             A

75% – 87%             B

60% – 74%             C

50% – 59%            D

below 50%            F

 

Some Bookkeeping:

If you are unable to be present for a scheduled class, contact one of us BEFORE the class and we will make every effort to arrange for you to make up the work. If you are absent and have not contacted one of us by class time, you may not be able to make up the work. Students missing more than four classes total (for whatever reason) will receive no credit for participation.

 

Although it is our mission to help every student successfully complete E105/W131, occasionally a circumstance arises when a student is best advised to withdraw from the class. In this regard, there are some important dates for you to keep in mind. October 19, 2001, is the last date on which you can drop the class with a guaranteed grade of W. If you drop the class between October 19, 2001, and December 3, 2001, your grade may be a W or an F, depending on your current status in the class. You may not drop the class after December 3, 2001.

 


The Course Syllabus:

Class discussions and exams will be given according to the following schedule. Note that each class period is divided into two parts, “a” representing the 9-10:15 portion, and “b” representing the 10:30-11:45 portion. “ES” refers to the text Environmental Science, “BH” to The Blair Handbook. We reserve the right to announce changes made to this syllabus in class.

Week

Date

schedule for the day

class preparation

1

8/28

a: Introductions to the course

Environmental Science pre-test

b: Video—People’s Century, Endangered Planet; Reflective writing response to video

 

 

8/30

a: Student introductions; ES Chapter 1: Environmental Interrelationships; ES Chapter 2: Environmental Ethics

b: Diagnostic writing exercise; Topic Development

    Essay #1 (Personal Experience Essay); [Guest—Nancy Greenwood?]

·         Read ES Ch. 1 and 2

·         Read DDT article

·         Read BH pp. 2-9; 74-88

2

9/4

a: Student introductions; Environmental Science Quiz 1; ES Chapter 3: Risk and Cost: Elements of Decision Making

b: Overview of the Writing Process; Invention

·         Read ES Ch. 3

·         Read BH pp. 26-36; 49-72

 

9/6

a: Student Introductions; Environmental Science Quiz 2; ES Chapter 3: Continued

b: Thesis Statement

[Check on the quiz days]

·         Read handout

 

3

9/11

a: Student introductions; Environmental Science Quiz 3; ES Chapter 4: Interrelated Scientific Principles: Matter, Energy, and Environment; preparation for laboratory experiment

b: Abstract/Concrete Language; Use of Supporting Detail; Style

·         Read ES Ch. 4

·         Read BH, pp. 425-440

·         Personal Exp. Paragraph DUE

 

9/13

a: Laboratory Experiment 1: Separating and Identifying FD&C Dyes by Paper Chromatography; debriefing after laboratory experiment; Review for Exam 1

b. Review of Drafts (Essay #1); Grammar/Usage Review (Comma Splices and Commas)

·         Essay 1 Draft DUE

·         Read laboratory experiment

·         Complete Experiment 1 Pre-Laboratory Assignment

·         Read BH pp. 513-523; 640-666

4

9/18

a: Summarizing; Paragraphing

b. Environmental Science EXAM 1 (Ch. 1-4)

·         Read BH pp 364-375

·         Prepare for Environmental Science EXAM 1

·         Experiment 1 Calculations, Post-laboratory Questions Due

 

9/20

a: ES Chapter 5: Interactions: Environment and Organisms

b: Topic/Thesis Development Essay 2 (Habitat Essay) ; Summarizing

·         Read Article

·         Read ES Ch. 5

·         Preview ES Ch. 6

·         Personal Experience Essay DUE

 

5

9/25

a: Select organism for Habitat paper;  IUCAT training

b: Research/Writing time

[Guest—Angie Becker?]

·         Summary DUE

·         Read BH  pp. 168-192

 

 

 

 

9/27

a: ES Chapter 5: Interactions: Environment and Organisms

b: Introductions and Conclusions; Grammar/Usage 

    Review (Apostrophes)

·         Read ES Chapter 5

·         Read BH pp. 376-390; 678-687

 

week

Date

Schedule for the day

class preparation

6

10/2

a: ES Chapter 5: continued; ES Chapter 6: Kinds of Ecosystems and Communities

b: Essay #2 Development

·         Read ES Ch. 6

·         Read BH  pp.441-454; 89-105

 

 

10/4

a: Environmental Science Quiz 4; Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources Problem Solving Activity with graded responses

b: Review Thesis Statement; Essay #2 Development; Sample Essays

·         Read BH pp. 337-345; 441-454

7

10/9

a: Environmental Science Quiz 5; ES Chapter 6: continued

b: Review Thesis/Outline/Intro (Habitat Essay);

    Sample Essays

·         Read ES Ch. 6

·         Draft of Thesis/Outline/Intro DUE (Habitat Essay)

·         Read BH pp. 314-336

 

10/11

a: Review ES Chapters 5 and 6

b: Environmental Science video with graded responses

·         Read BH pp.193-209

8

10/16

a: Environmental Science Quiz 6; ES Chapter 12: Human Impact on Resources and Ecosystems

b: Review Drafts of Habitat Essay; Grammar/Usage Review (MLA Format)

·         Read ES Ch. 12

·         Read BH pp. 256-284

·         Draft DUE (Habitat Essay)

 

10/18

a: ES Chapter 12: continued

b: Topic Development Essay 3 (Problem Analysis Essay); Grammar/Usage Review (modification)

·         Read BH pp. 566-587

·         Habitat Essay DUE

 

9

10/23

a: Environmental Science Quiz 7; Public Goods Problem Solving Activity with graded responses

b: Essay Development (Problem Analysis Essay); Grammar/Usage Review  (pronouns)

·         Read BH pp. 588-617

 

10/25

a: Discussion: Current Issues

b: Paragraph Revision Workshop

·         Reread BH pp. 364-375

10

10/30

a: Essay development (Problem Analysis Essay); Grammar/Usage Review (Apostrophes)

b: Environmental Science EXAM 2 (Ch. 5, 6, 12)

·         Reread BH  pp. 99-105; 746-757

·         Prepare for Environmental Science EXAM 2

 

11/1

a: ES Chapter 16: Water Management; Preparation for Laboratory Experiment;

b: Topic development/Support (Problem Analysis Essay)

·         Read ES Ch. 16

11

11/6

a: Laboratory Experiment 2: Estimating the pH of Some Solutions; Debriefing after laboratory experiment

b: Review of thesis/outline/intro (Problem Analysis Essay); Grammar/Usage Review (S-V Agr)

·         Read BH pp. 549-565

·         Thesis/Outline/Intro DUE (Problem Analysis Essay)

·         Read Laboratory Experiment 2

·         Pre-Laboratory Assignment DUE

 

11/8

a: Review of drafts (Problem Analysis Essay)

b:  Externalities problem solving activity, followed by in-class assignment

[Registration?]

·         Draft of Problem Analysis Essay DUE

·         Experiment 2 Calculations, Post Laboratory Questions DUE

 


 

Week

Date

Schedule for the day

class preparation

12

11/13

a: Environmental Science Quiz 8

b: Reading critically; preparing for a debate; debate topics; Fact/Opinion/Inference

·         Problem Analysis Essay DUE

·         Read Article (Annotate)

 

11/15

a: ES Chapter 19: Solid Waste Management and Disposal   [Check on all of the ES numbers, esp. the ones after 16]

b: Explanation of debate assignment; Topic Development (preparation for debate)

·         Read ES Ch. 19

·         Read BH pp. 106-114

·         Read Debate Issue

13

11/20

a: ES Chapter 19: continued

b: Group discussions/prepare for debate; Library research

·         Read BH pp. 114-131

·         Prepare research for debate group

 

11/21 to 11/25

 

NO CLASS—THANKSGIVING  BREAK

 

14

11/27

a: Environmental Science Quiz 9; Guest speakers: student issues

b:  Logical Use of Evidence

·         Read BH pp. 10-25

·         Read handout (annotate)

·         Research for debate

 

11/29

a: ES Chapter 20: Regulating Hazardous Materials

b: Preparing Oral Presentations; View sample debate on environmental issues

·         Read ES Chapter 20

·         Read BH  pp. 785-792

15

12/4

a: Guest speaker  [Pat Likens?]

b: Environmental Science Quiz 10; Group development of debate

·         Develop arguments/ counter arguments for debate

·         Summary DUE (Issue article)

 

12/6

a. Debates

b. Debates

·         Bibliography Due

16

12/11

a: Debates

b: Debates

·         Summary/Critique of Guest speaker DUE

 

12/13

a: Debates

b: Debates; Distribute final writing prompt

 

17

12/18

a: Environmental Science EXAM 3 (including post-test, Ch. 16, 18-20)

b: English Essay Exam (Position Paper)

 

 

·         Prepare for Environmental Science EXAM 3


 

Outcomes and Related Abilities:

The eight primary Outcomes identified by the IUK Faculty are:

 

I. Communication Outcomes

                        1. Read, comprehend, and interpret written materials critically

                        2. Listen, comprehend, and interpret oral materials

                        3. Write English clearly, grammatically, and effectively

                        4. Speak English clearly, grammatically, and effectively

                        5. Develop interpersonal and group communication abilities

 

II. Problem Solving Outcomes

                        6. Observe, think, and reason analytically to solve problems

 

III. Technology and Information Outcomes

                        7. Develop abilities with computers and other information technologies

                        8. Develop skills to locate information resources

 

The Level 1, 2, and 3 abilities associated with each of the eight Outcomes to be assessed in the IUK freshman general education curriculum are displayed on the following pages.

 

 

I. COMMUNICATION OUTCOMES

 

1. Read, comprehend, and interpret written materials critically

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

use a reading method appropriate to the type of material and to the purpose for reading

interpret figurative language and identify words and phrases that appeal to emotion

ascertain the impact of language choices in the written material

 

identify the main ideas and thesis of the work

explain the point or purpose of a passage as a whole, or of significant portions of that passage

identify the logical structure of written materials

 

identify the claims in the material and the evidence that is supporting those claims

identify conclusions which follow from embedded evidence

evaluate the quality, strength and appropriateness of the evidence presented

 

identify relationships or connections explicitly stated in a passage

identify relationship that can be inferred but are not always explicit

demonstrate an understanding of the nature of inference

 


 

2. Listen, comprehend, and interpret materials presented orally

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

use a listening method appropriate to the type of material and to the purpose for listening

interpret figurative language and identify words and phrases that appeal to emotion

ascertain the impact of language choices in the oral material

 

identify the main ideas and thesis of an oral passage

explain the point or purpose of an oral presentation as a whole, or of significant portions of that presentation

identify the logical structure of an oral message

 

identify the claims in the material, and the evidence that is supporting those claims

identify conclusions which follow from embedded evidence

evaluate the quality, strength, and appropriateness of the evidence presented

 

identify relationships or connections explicitly stated in an oral passage

identify relationships that can be inferred but are not always explicit

demonstrate an understanding of the nature of inference

 


 


3. Write English clearly, grammatically, and effectively

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

understand and begin to exhibit rhetorical choices and focus/thesis based on audience and purpose

consistently make rhetorical choices and develop focus appropriate to audience and purpose

make rhetorical choices and develop focus appropriate to an audience within a chosen academic discipline

 

identify and use appropriate word choice, style, and tone

consistently use appropriate word choice, style, and tone

exhibit more advanced word choice, style, and tone that involves the audience in the message

 

recognize and practice the various stages of the writing process: planning, drafting, and revising (including organization and transition)

refine understanding and practice of the writing process through self critique

adapt writing process to a chosen academic discipline, including patterns appropriate to the discipline

 

generally use appropriate conventions (grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation)

consistently use appropriate writing conventions

use appropriate visual aids and conventions of MLA and/or APA documentation

 

Use personal observation and experience to reach reasonable conclusions

locate and incorporate appropriate evidence to support claims

locate and incorporate evidence appropriate to a chosen academic discipline

 


 

4. Speak English clearly, grammatically, and effectively

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

define audience and purpose

make rhetorical choices appropriate to the purpose of the message

critique and evaluate the rhetorical choices in a variety of speech presentations

 

use appropriate writing conventions (grammar, sentence structure, intonation)

identify and use appropriate word choice, style, and tone

use language that exhibits appropriate word choice to involve the audience in the message

 

recognize the various stages of the speech writing process: discovering topics, generating ideas, planning, drafting, revising, and using proper outlining and bibliographical documentation

practice the various stages of the speech writing process, incorporating appropriate evidence and arguments to support claims

evaluate the quality, strength and appropriateness of the evidence presented

 

use eye contact, posture, gestures, and facial expressions appropriate to subject, audience, and environment

use presentation software

communicate comfortably; ask and answer questions

 

5. Develop inter-personal and group communication skills

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

be sensitive to the feelings of others

involve all participants in a discussion, and build on the previous speaker’s comments

build consensus, or find other ways of bring closure to a session

 

use a clear message format

summarize and paraphrase the group discussion

monitor and adapt performance to the situation

 

identify group problem solving processes

use a group problem solving process

present group work and/or group research effectively

 


II. PROBLEM SOLVING OUTCOMES

 

6. Observe, think, and reason analytically to solve problems

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

identify statements of fact, statements of opinion, logical arguments, and emotional arguments

distinguish among statements of fact, statements of opinion, logical arguments, and emotional arguments

use statements of fact, statements of opinion, logical arguments, and emotional arguments

 

distinguish between reasoning (e.g. explanation, argument) and other types of discourse (e.g. description, assertion)

identify whether an argument is predominantly emotional or logical

revise arguments and findings, based on critical reflection

 

identify the relevant evidence and experiences needed to make a decision, solve a problem, or create new knowledge

identify the relationships that contribute to addressing questions and solving problems

evaluate the quality and sufficiency of evidence and other forms of support for a position

 

recognize that each person has a unique perspective

compare the perspectives of individuals

accurately assess the similarities and differences in points of view

 

III. TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION OUTCOMES

7. Develop skills with computers and other information technologies

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

identify the skills needed in Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, operating systems, internet, and presentation software to support a successful college experience

perform essential tasks identified in Level One software areas (e.g. setting margins, summing numbers, and creating pie charts)

select among and integrate between the computer tools necessary to support the demands of their future university academic work

 


 

8. Develop skills to locate information resources:

Level One: Student will demonstrate the ability to:

Level Two: Student will successfully perform at Level One and demonstrate the ability to:

Level Three: Student will successfully perform at Level Two and demonstrate the ability to:

 

identify library services (Library tour); use IUCAT to identify a book; use a general periodical index (print or electronic) to identify a magazine or newspaper article; use the Library of Congress (LC) call number system to locate books and periodical; use the IUK Periodicals Holdings List

use a specialized periodical index or abstract (print or electronic) to locate scholarly articles; identify criteria that indicate a scholarly article

evaluate and assess research materials (print or electronic) as to appropriateness for research papers, speeches, and reports