2012 Academic Affairs Winter Meeting

Thursday, February 9, 2012 to Saturday, February 11, 2012
JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country • San Antonio, Texas

“Tools and Strategies for Institutional Transformation”
This past July, our Academic Affairs Summer Meeting in Portland focused on course redesign, where we explored ideas for re-imagining undergraduate education through course transformation. That meeting created a host of ideas and initiatives that are starting to crystallize among participating campuses.

About the Conference

For the Winter Meeting in San Antonio on February 9-11, we plan to extend the focus on course redesign to complete both our work and our thinking on ways to revitalize courses. Our theme, “Tools and Strategies for Institutional Transformation,” explores ways that our campuses are taking ideas from the summer meeting, from their own planning, and from Red Balloon Project strategies we have been developing, to respond to the challenges of this new century. We’re particularly interested in data analytics, blended courses, “flipped” courses, large course transformation, and national courses created and taught by consortiums of faculty. We’re also interested in the role of private providers, both in course design and delivery. We will be exploring new program designs in areas such as general education, international education, and teacher education. Finally, we want to look at new course and program materials being developed and used in a variety of settings.

At the same time, the conference will have sections that look beyond course redesign to address a number of other critical issues that academic officers and other institutional leaders are confronting such as budget reductions, accreditation, strategic positioning, new faculty roles, and enrollment management.

Provosts may invite anyone from their campus to participate in the Academic Affairs Winter Meeting who they think can help contribute to institutional transformation. At the Summer Meeting in July, we had associate provosts and other senior institutional officers, as well as deans, faculty members, and other institutional leaders

I hope you’ll join us for this exciting winter conference in the heart of Texas.

For questions about the Academic Affairs Winter Meeting, please contact:

Jill M. Gately
Manager, ALC Meetings and Outreach Programs
(202) 478-4668 
gatelyj@aascu.org 


Provosts to Presidents Program: An AASCU Program for Aspiring Presidents

The Provost to President Program, all materials, and all meals/receptions are provided at no cost to participants through a generous grant from the American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI).

For those of you considering a move to a presidency, consider registering for the Provost to President Program (PPP) taking place on Sunday, February 12th, 2012 from 7:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. at this year’s Academic Affairs Meeting in San Antonio. You must be a registered participant in the Academic Affairs Winter Meeting in order to be eligible for this free program.

This program is designed for individuals interested in becoming a president. The curriculum focuses on presidential leadership. Taught by three experienced presidents, the program examines leadership approaches and strategies that are used in successful presidencies.

The core part of the program takes place on Sunday, February 12th. In addition to the Sunday program, there are two other events that are part of this program: Friday, February 11th program and dinner (5:30 to 8:30 pm), and a Saturday afternoon workshop on search strategies and approaches (reading a position announcement, preparing your vitae, writing an application letter, interviewing strategies, etc.).

Schedule  

Friday, February 10
5:30 p.m. to 8:30 pm.
Introduction to the Seminar and Dinner

Saturday, February 11
3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Workshop: Mechanics of the Search

Sunday, February 12
7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lessons in Presidential Leadership

You must register in advance for this program. To participate, you should register for the Academic Affairs Winter meeting (Click here for AA Winter Registration), and then register separately for the PPP program (to protect your confidentiality) (Click here for PPP Program Registration).

Please contact George Mehaffy if you have any questions about this program.

George L. Mehaffy
mehaffyg@aascu.org
(202) 478-4672

NEW! The Rosetta Stone Project

As part of our Red Balloon Project effort to transform undergraduate education, we invited Rosetta Stone to participate in the Academic Affairs Meeting in Portland last July. They reported that the conversations about foreign language instruction between Rosetta Stone representatives and participants at the Academic Affairs Meeting revealed several widespread challenges:

1. First, while language departments are shrinking, the need for language learning is growing. Spanish language ability in fields like nursing and criminology, for example, makes an immediate and tangible difference in employment opportunities for those majors, yet few find what they need in the traditional language department.

2. Additionally, while globalization has found its way into campus mission statements, little has been done to facilitate students' ability to actually communicate globally. Languages like Mandarin and Arabic, which account for billions of the world's citizens, are still taught at only a minority of institutions. The very few students who are able to participate in study abroad programs leave campus with the expectation that they'll learn the language when they get there, and foreign students arrive on campus with minimal competence in English.

We have created a partnership with Rosetta Stone to create new models of language instruction, blending technology and live instruction on campus. We want to find solutions to some of the most complex issues of language instruction and acquisition: course design, foreign language pedagogy, blending technology with the traditional classroom, and partnering between universities and other providers of educational materials and experiences. We plan to launch this initiative at the Academic Affairs Meeting in February in San Antonio. We would like to gather a group of interested provosts, department chairs, and language instructors to meet with Rosetta Stone staff during a late afternoon workshop on Friday afternoon, February 10th, 2012. We intend to form a working group of campuses, each of which will be trying out various strategies of interest to them, while staying in contact with one another and with Rosetta Stone staff, creating, in effect, a laboratory of experimentation. Our hope is that this working group will then be able to provide ideas and strategies for many other AASCU campuses.

We hope some of you will be interested in participating yourself, or bringing a faculty member or administrator from your language programs, to help us build 21st century models of language instruction. 
 

Schedule top

Wednesday, February 8

Tours and Activities TBA


Thursday, February 9

8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 
Registration

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 
Red Balloon Steering Committee Meeting (invitation only)

1 p.m. – 3 p.m. 
Pre-Conference Workshop: Workshop for New Provosts (free of charge for registered attendees, RSVP required)
A workshop for provosts who have been in their role for less than a year.

Facilitators: Beverly Kopper, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and Catherine Ann Riordan, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Western Washington University

Panelists: Virginia Horvath, Vice President for Academic Affairs, State University of New York at Fredonia; Patricia Kleine, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; and Gary Peer, recently retired Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Tarleton State University, Texas 

4 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. 
Opening Plenary:  How Digital Technologies and Open Educational Resources are Disrupting Higher Education
The Internet, increasingly affordable computing, open licensing, open access journals and open educational resources provide the foundation for a world in which a quality education can be a basic human right. Yet before we break the "iron triangle" of access, cost and quality with new models, we need to educate policy makers about the obviousness of open policy and understand the powerful intersection of digital works, licensing and access.

Presenter: Cable Green, Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons

5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Opening Reception sponsored by ETS 


Friday, February 10

7:30 a.m. – 9 a.m.
Networking Breakfast

7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. 
Optional Breakfast Meeting for Women 
Facilitator:  Peg Gray-Vickrey, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs, Texas A&M University-Central Texas

7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
Optional Breakfast Breakout for Becoming a Provost Participants and Executive Leadership Academy/Provost to President Participants
Facilitator:  Ann Die Hasselmo, President, American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI)

9 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Plenary

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. 
Refreshment Break

10:45 a.m. – Noon
Featured Sessions

Featured Session: Entrepreneurship, The Curriculum and Faculty Development
Quality undergraduate education in today’s global economy must produce engaged and liberally educated graduates who are capable innovators and entrepreneurs. To achieve those outcomes, emphasis must be placed on organizing and funding entrepreneurial initiatives, educating and rewarding faculty, promoting the value of experiential learning, and utilizing outreach to provide opportunities to a diverse cultural and economic population. Southeast Missouri State University has developed a model for entrepreneurship education which engages all disciplines, develops enlightened faculty and students to compete in the new economy, and integrates the entrepreneurial spirit into the curriculum.

Moderator: Richard Dunfee, Executive Director, Grants Resource Center, AASCU
Presenters: James L. Stapleton, Executive Director, Douglas C. Greene Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Southeast Missouri State University
Reactors: Carlos Vargas-Aburto, Provost, Kutztown University and Vicki Golich, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs


Featured Session:  Student Learning, Quality and the Degree Qualifications Profile
In early 2010, Lumina Foundation released the beta version of the Degree Qualifications Profile, in an effort to prompt discussion of the quality and meaning of degrees in US higher education. This session focuses on the genesis and content of the Profile, and explores the current grants and projects underway to test the content and utility of the Profile, including the partnership with AASCU.

Presenter: Marcus Kolb, Program Officer, Lumina Foundation


Featured Session: Student Learning Progress Model—Lessons Learned 
19 institutions representing all types/levels of higher education Beta-Tested a student learning progress model alternative to the traditional metric. This panel of participating 4-year institution Provosts share their experience and lessons learned.

Model Designer: Gary A. Rice, Associate Vice Provost –IR, University of Alaska Anchorage 

Panelists: Rachel E. Albert, Vice President for Academic Affairs, University Maine at Fort Kent; Kathryn Cruz-Uribe, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California State University, Monterey Bay; Michael A. Driscoll, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of Alaska Anchorage; Jaimie L. Hebert, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Sam Houston State University (TX); Sandra J. Jordan, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Georgia College & State University; Tes A. Mehring, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Life, Emporia State University (Kan); William J. Radke, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma; and Martha L. Venn, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Macon State College (Ga)


Featured Session: Fostering Course Redesign across the Institution and State
Through case studies, the presenters describe the processes used and challenges faced to support innovative teaching and enlist more faculty with the redesign process at Southeast Missouri State University (SEMO) and across the state. SEMO is in the midst of multiple initiatives designed to foster course redesign, including a cohort system of mutual support for course developers, collaborative courses shared among state institutions, a statewide initiative with the NCAT to redesign courses to be made available to all state schools, and a blended learning course co-developed by seven campuses in Missouri through an NGLC grant with AASCU and UCF.

Presenters: David Starrett, Dean, University Studies and Academic Information Services; Willie Redmond, Professor of Economics and Finance and Director of the Missouri Alliance for Collaborative Education; Sophia Scott, Interim Assistant to the President for Equity and Diversity Issues and Associate Professor in Industrial and Engineering Technology; Missy Phegley, Chair of Freshman English Committee; Tamela Randolph, Interim Dean of the College of Education; and Allen Gathman, Associate Dean for Online Learning, Southeast Missouri State University


Noon – 2 p.m.
Lunch on Your Own and RSVP Sponsor Lunches

2 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session: Re-imagining American Literature 
Re-visioning what is meant by the American literature survey course and its text, students will create their own criteria for the course, including the choices of authors and works to be studied and the critical elements the students deem relevant. With the GLO Bible as its model (globible.com), we will create an electronic, media rich anthology that combines primary texts from the traditional canon with audio, video, art and criticism to enhance student-centered and challenge-based learning. 

Presenters: Rodney BaileyGena Christopher and Jennifer Foster, English Instructors, Jacksonville State University (AL) 


Concurrent Session:  Partnering for Global Course Distribution
Global opportunities for degree delivery are opening at a rapid pace. However, there are many challenges in effectively capitalizing on these opportunities, challenges include selecting good partners, governmental and accreditation constraints, technology opportunities and limitation, and financial constraints, among others.

Presenter: James R. Hallmark, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, West Texas A&M University


Concurrent Session: Taking the Next Step in Building a Coherent First Year Learning Experience—First Year Learning Initiative 
Northern Arizona University’s First Year Learning Initiative (FYLI) creates a coherent formal learning experience that socializes, supports, and develops first year students for academic success. The program aligns first year courses with a common design template which ensures that first year courses produce: 1) increased quantity and quality of student effort; 2) higher rate of utilization of academic support programs; 3) higher rates of course completion; 4) greater learning/achievement of key capacities during the first year; and 5) targeted intervention with disengaged and struggling students. FYLI website: www.nau.edu/FYLI 

Presenters: Karen Pugliesi, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs; Michelle Miller, Professor and Chair, Psychology; and Blase Scarnati, Associate Professor, Director of First Year Seminar & Global Learning, Northern Arizona University 


Concurrent Session: Academic Reorganization—Engaging a Campus-wide Conversation 
This session focuses on the process used to engage the California State University (CSU) Chico campus community in using academic reorganization as a transformation and cost-saving strategy. The goal is to reduce the number of colleges and to realign programs to establish new synergies and potential for the future. 

Presenter: Sandra M. Flake, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, CSU Chico 


Concurrent Session: Commission on Building the University of the 21st Century
University of North Texas (UNT) Dallas has created a Commission on Building the University of the 21st Century consisting of national educational, civic, governmental and business leaders with a passion for education to assist the new university in developing its academic, financial and operating models. A key partner in this effort is Bain & Co., an international consulting firm, who has provided $1M of pro bono services to aid in the benchmarking, market research and strategic model development for UNT Dallas leaders and the 21st Century Commission. This session reports on the status of the project and key observations to date.

Presenter: John Beehler, Provost and Vice President for Academic Excellence and Student Success, University of North Texas at Dallas


Concurrent Session: Supporting Innovation with Democracy 
Dramatic shifts in the economy, increased global competition, and the adoption of a market mindset in higher education are undermining the foundations of liberal arts education and threatening state support for public higher education. As the economy shifts, institutions of higher education continue to be pressed to prepare graduates for a successful career while the importance of a well-educated citizenry is supplanted. How can colleges and universities respond and succeed? Can an institution at any level educate for democracy when it replicates within its own structures and hierarchy non-democratic practices? 

Metro State is finding three critical elements that seem to support success and innovation: democratic structures within the workplace; development of social capital or networks of trust and collaboration; and leadership. The Metro State team discusses a variety of ways in which the college is seeking to strengthen democratic structures and enhance social capital on campus, providing support for innovation and change. 

Presenters: Vicki Golich, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs; Elizabeth Parmelee, Director, Center for Individualized Learning; Sandra Haynes, Dean of the School of Professional Studies; and Mark Potter, Director, Center for Faculty Development, Metropolitan State College of Denver 


3 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. 
Concurrent Sessions


Concurrent Session: Taking the Curriculum to Task— Blended Learning and CLA in the Classroom
At the core of blended learning strategies is the practice of performance-based teaching and learning. Performance-based and CLA in the Classroom tasks engage students in authentic, real-life learning activities and allow for the assessment of written communication skills, key academic skills and discipline-specific knowledge. In particular, the performance tasks of CLA in the Classroom require students to analyze evidence and determine source bias, making these tasks effective means by which to measure learner outcomes. This presentation offers attendees the following: 1) an introduction to CLA in the Classroom Performance Tasks and blended learning strategies; 2) a demonstration of ways to use CLA Performance Tasks as teaching and learning tools; 3) a series of sample CLA Performance Tasks for review; and 4) an invitation to use CLA Performance Tasks at attendees’ institutions, along with score sheets and assessment rubrics.

Presenters: Daniel Kulmala, Assistant Dean of the Graduate School, Teagle Foundation Teaching and Learning Scholar, Fort Hays State University; and Marc Chun, Director of Education, Council for Aid to Education (CAE), Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)

Concurrent Session: Transforming the Culture of a Regional University through Strategic Planning and Change Management 
Jacksonville State University implemented a strategic planning process designed to address change management, culture definition and competitive advantage to position the university in the next five years. This plan integrates the University’s commitment to developing a learning centered campus as part of AASCU’s Red Balloon Initiative. 

Presenters: Rebecca O. Turner, Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs and Alicia Simmons, Director, Institutional Research and Assessment, Jacksonville State University, Alabama 


Concurrent Session: Transformation through Enrollment Management 
A comprehensive approach to enrollment management helped this university put in place recruitment, retention and continuation to graduation strategies which ultimately are transforming the university in a variety of ways. With an initial focus on recruitment, implementation emphasis has now shifted to retention. In particular, the establishment of a Student Success Center in partnership with the university library consolidates writing assistance, tutoring and first year programs to boost retention rates and serves as a significant implementation benchmark. This presentation describes retention strategies, their implementation and impact within the context of the Student Success Center model. Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) is an approach used to accomplish enrollment goals by focusing the entire university culture, facilities, and resources toward these ends. Contemporary universities must be concerned about retention rates and employ SEM to remain competitive. 

Presenters: Lynette J. Olson, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and William A. Ivy, Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success, Pittsburg State University, Kansas 


Concurrent Session: From Despair to Too Much Fun—Creating a Campus Accreditation/Assessment Culture 
In 2001 the Higher Learning Commission Visiting Team to Henderson State University (HSU) said, “It is unclear why, when faced with increasing pressure from the higher Learning Commission, the State of Arkansas, and professional accreditation bodies, Henderson State has not devoted the necessary time, energy, and resources to address the assessment issue and demonstrate progress in the assessment of student learning.” This presentation addresses HSU’s transformation from a university with no assessment plan to one with a multi-faceted, comprehensive plan (including Assessment Team initiatives, program plans, an Assessment Team Assessment Plan, a new Strategic Plan and a University Assessment Plan); the Assessment Team’s low-cost initiatives have created an institutional culture of accreditation and assessment that can be replicated at many institutions, regardless of their particular regional accreditation. 

Presenters: Vernon G. Miles, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and Wrenette Tedder, Director of Assessment, Henderson State University, Arkansas

4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Workshop Sessions

Workshop Session: Using Sustainability as a Conceptual Organizer for Red Balloon Transformation 
Sustainability Education (and all that implies) is an area of major importance nationally and globally, and it also ranks among the top concerns and interests of college students today. As Red Balloon initiatives are underway to identify and collaborate on those areas of curriculum that are, or should be common, among our institutions, there is a strong case to be made for sustainability education as a core learning expectation for all of our baccalaureate degree recipients. 

This session is intended to bring together individuals from campuses where there is an interest in advancing sustainability education. It is hoped that there may be sufficient interest, coming out of this session, that interested campuses may be interested in working collaboratively on developing this core curriculum and teaching/learning modules that would be shared among institutions who are interested, as a part of the AASCU Red Balloon initiative. 

Presenters: Barbara G. Burch, Provost Emeritus and Civic Engagement Scholar and Nancy Givens, Sustainability Programs Development Coordinator, Western Kentucky University 


Workshop: Using a Rapid Prototyping Process to Transform Teacher Education Curricula 
The College of Education and Professional Studies (COEPS) at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater launched a transformational curricula redesign process during the summer of 2011. This model process is guiding, and will continue to guide, the College in curricula modifications and new curricula development. Complex institutional/ organizational goals from the University of Wisconsin-System, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and COEPS, as well as the three goals of the Red Balloon Project—to lower cost, increase student participation, and respond to the challenges of technology guided the process. Other institutions may be interested in this transformational process model that provides a platform for bold and rapid curricula prototyping while simultaneously changing organizational culture. Practical implementation strategies are included in this session. 

Presenters: Beverly Kopper, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Katy Heyning, Dean, College of Education and Professional Studies; and Ellyn M. Dickmann, Associate Dean, College of Education and Professional Studies, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater


Workshop Session: MyCore—Outcomes-Based, Student-Centered General Education at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania has abandoned the “courses in categories” model of general education and adopted a new model that emphasizes the connectedness of disciplines, knowledge and skills and also recognizes the achievement of general education outcomes outside the traditional classroom and across university divisions. The most radical change in our general education program is the adoption of a point system, independent of the academic credit system, that allows any course or co-curricular activity to contribute to one or more general education outcomes. For example, a history course with extensive writing may not only contribute to a students’ knowledge of the humanities but also their ability to communicate. A community service or leadership training program operated by the student affairs division could be counted towards the student goal of exhibiting good citizenship. The fact that any one course may deliver multiple general education outcomes is certainly not news to faculty. However, the new Bloomsburg University general education program makes this explicit for students, faculty and others. All assessments of student learning outcomes in this program are linked to the AAC&U VALUE Rubrics. Our name for this program, MyCore, emphasizes student ownership of the way they achieve the goals for general education. 

Presenters: Ira K. Blake, Provost and Senior Vice President; Jonathan M. Lincoln, Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education; Patricia J. Beyer, Associate Professor and Chair, General Education Council; Carl J. Chimi, Associate Professor and Chair, Bloomsburg University Curriculum Committee; Sheila Dove Jones, Professor and Interim Director of Planning and Assessment; and John H. Riley, Professor and Chair, General Education Task Force, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania 

Workshop Session: Creating New Models for Language Instruction
We have created a partnership with Rosetta Stone to create new models of language instruction, blending technology and live instruction on campus. We want to find solutions to some of the most complex issues of language instruction and acquisition: course design, foreign language pedagogy, blending technology with the traditional classroom, and partnering between universities and other providers of educational materials and experiences. We plan to launch this initiative at the Academic Affairs Meeting in February in San Antonio. This session will involve interested provosts, department chairs, and language instructors, meeting with Rosetta Stone staff for an opening discussion. There may be additional times during the San Antonio conference when these folks can continue the discussion. We intend to form a working group of campuses, each of which will be trying out various strategies of interest to them, while staying in contact with one another and with Rosetta Stone staff, creating, in effect, a laboratory of experimentation. Our hope is that this working group will then be able to provide ideas and strategies for many other AASCU campuses.

Discussion Leaders: Rosetta Stone Staff


Workshop Session:  Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) (by invitation)
Representatives from the State University of New York System, the University System of Georgia and the Texas A & M system will convene a work session to discuss progress on implementation of the Lumina grant goals of testing the workability and usefulness of the degree qualification profile and to discuss approaches to common activities across the three systems. This is a by invitation session.
Facilitator: George Mehaffy, Vice President for Academic Leadership and Change, AASCU 


5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. 
Provost to President Dinner sponsored by AALI

5:30 p.m. - 10 p.m.
AASCU Providing Shuttles in between JW Marriott and San Antonio's Riverwalk

6 p.m.
Dinner Sign-up Sheets Available


Saturday, February 11

6 a.m. – 9 a.m.
Breakfast on Own

7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. 
Breakfast Meeting: Provosts of Color

7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Breakfast Meeting: Next Generation Learning Challenges Steering Committee

9 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Plenary Session: Student Success Does Not Arise By Chance
Though retention programs abound, few institutions have been able to make substantial improvements in the success of their students. Those that have recognize that being effective requires them to be intentional, structured, and proactive in their actions so as not to leave the success of their students to chance. Vincent Tinto describes what these institutions do and what their actions suggest for all institutions seeking to improve student retention.

Presenter: Vincent Tinto, Distinguished University Professor, Syracuse University, New York

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. 
Refreshment Break

10:45 a.m. – Noon
Featured Sessions

Featured Session: Degree Attainment Efficiency—An Improved Metric for Reporting Graduation Productivity
The “Six Year Graduation Rate” metric does not incorporate all graduates of a university. It does not include part-time students, transfer students or students who begin their study in the spring semester. A more complete picture of degree production at colleges and universities is required other than the “six year graduation rate.” To address these short comings and others of this widely cited metric, we offer the “Degree Attainment Efficiency” metric as a measure that includes all graduates, whether full-time or part-time students and whether transferred in or took more than six years to complete their degrees.

Presenter: Ralph V. Rogers, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Purdue University Calumet


Featured Session: American Commonwealth Partnership—Revitalizing the Deep Civic Mission and Connections to Place of Colleges and Universities 
The American Commonwealth Partnership (ACP) is a movement that seeks to bring together thousands of universities, colleges, community colleges, schools and civic partners to promote civic education in the United States. ACP is working in partnership with the White House Office of Public Engagement, the Department of Education, and AASCU to reclaim the civic mission of higher education and its P-20 education partners. It builds on multiple strands of public engagement in recent years, including civic learning and education, college and university contributions to communities as “stewards of place” and “anchoring institutions,” and public scholarship which addresses pressing public problems. All raise questions about current rankings systems for colleges and universities which rebrand higher education as a private good, not a public good. 

Presenters: Harry C. Boyte, Senior Fellow, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota and the Center for Democracy and Citizenship, Augsburg College; and Blase Scarnati, Associate Professor, Director of First Year Seminar & Global Learning, Northern Arizona University 


Featured Session: Redesigning Concurrent Enrollment With Hybrid Courses—the Utah TICE Project 
The Utah System of Higher Education is creating six technology-intensive concurrent enrollment (TICE) courses that satisfy general education requirements at institutions statewide. Six teams of faculty developers are answering the "What do we do now?" question by conducting a thoughtful analysis of how to leverage the best attributes of online and face-to-face modes of instruction. The result will be six new hybrid courses to be offered starting Fall 2012 for regular course credit or for concurrent enrollment credit to advanced high school students. A key feature is the creation of a centralized learning outcomes assessment instrument for each course that will be completed by every student in every course section. The project leader, Chuck Wight, demonstrates selected modules of the intro courses in Art, Chemistry, English, Math and Psychology. 

Presenter: Charles A. Wight, Dean of the Graduate School, University of Utah


Featured Session: Strategically Internationalizing Your Campus Using Trends and Data
This session describes a multifaceted approach to reach the university’s internationalization goals. It is not enough to simply create a recruitment plan. The university must consider using trends and data to craft and execute a university wide plan for internationalization. There are five majors areas to consider when strategically crafting your plan: 
• Strategic International Enrollment Management 
• Resources and Data 
• Creating an International Recruitment, Enrollment and Retention Strategy 
• Executing Your Plan 
• Measuring Success 
These topics, and examples of best practices, are the focus of this program. 

Presenters: Susan P. Kassab, Director, University Recruitment and Advising Services and Jim Crawley, Director, University Recruitment and Advising, ELS Educational Services; and Provost TBA

Featured Session: The Impact of Regional Initiatives and External Partnerships on Academic Affairs
As the economic recession has deepened, state and federal governments have promoted the importance and value of partnerships and regional initiatives in order to strengthen the economy and support workforce development. These initiatives have significantly changed the approach to and structure of campus outreach efforts, particularly as they relate to economic and community development efforts. The impact of these changes on academic affairs and the encouragement of faculty engagement in community and regional support efforts will be reviewed in this session.

Moderator: Linda L. Lamwers, Provost, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Presenter: Richard Dunfee, Executive Director, Grants Resource Center, AASCU
Reactors: Raymond W. Alden III, Executive Vice President and Provost; Northern Illinois University; Steve Doblin, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Lamar University; and Susan Sciame-Giesecke, Executive Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, Indiana University Kokomo


Noon – 1:30 p.m.
Lunch and Breakouts
Sponsored by SunGard Higher Education
If you do not wish to participate in any of the breakouts, you may eat your lunch and have private meetings in Salon 5.

Lunch Breakout: The Next Generation Learning Challenge Blend
This session reviews the strategies being implemented for designing and delivering blended learning courses that are part of the Next Generation Learning Challenge grant. Grant participants from the 20 AASCU institutions are encouraged to discuss progress and challenges (i.e., academic, operational and reporting) as well as outcomes from their Fall 2011 delivered courses. While this session is designed as a work session for grant participants, others are welcome to listen and learn from their ongoing experiences in delivering blended learning courses and the value of the tools made available to them through the grant.

Facilitator: Thomas B. Cavanagh, Assistant Vice President, Center for Distributed Learning, University of Central Florida


Lunch Breakout: Try it! You’ll Like It! (or Maybe You Won’t, But Then We’ll Know How to Fix It): Pilot Test for a Simulation for Provosts
This is your opportunity to add your decision-making skills to the development of a computerized simulation of being a university provost. Utah Commissioner Bill Sederburg has created a successful computer-based simulation where groups of individuals play the role of a state legislator or college president. Bill Sederbur g and Liz Hitch (former Provost at two AASCU institutions) are altering the simulation for use by aspiring provosts. Join a small-group exercise using the simulation and provide critical feedback for applying the simulation to provost-type decisions. In the process, you might learn something about how you make decisions compared to your peers.

Facilitators: William A. Sederburg, Commissioner and Elizabeth J. Hitch, Associate Commissioner for Academic Affairs, Utah System of Higher Education

Lunch Breakout:  Feedback, Task Force Report on College Readiness
The AASCU Task Force on College Readiness, co-chaired by Tomás Morales and Jim Votruba and with ten presidents, is preparing a national report about innovative campus work with P-12 students. The report is intended to be a guide for presidents and other senior university leaders. Today’s session will be an informal discussion of the latest draft of the report and an opportunity to critique its overall framework and initial recommendations regarding the academic, personal and social aspects of college readiness. The report will include notable AASCU programs identified by a survey sent out last fall; if your campus has not yet responded, it can still do so at the following website http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/WEB22C2SHSKZ9M/

Facilitators: Carole Beere, Senior Director, Special Projects at Northern Kentucky University and Jolanda Westerhof, Director of Teacher Education, AASCU


Lunch Breakout:  Incorporating The New York Times into Your First Year Curriculum
The New York Times
in College is dedicated to helping new students make a connection to campus and their courses so they can become productive and engaged citizens with an informed global perspective. The New York Times in the First Year is designed to assist educators develop a range of competencies and skills in their students as well as to enhance student learning and engagement outside the classroom.

Presenters: Kevin Cappallo and Lynn Hall, National Education Directors, The New York Times


Lunch Breakout: Becoming a Provost Participants
Facilitator: Ann Die Hasselmo, President, American Academic Leadership Institute (AALI)

1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session: Re-Imagining How to Fund the Future in the California State University System 
How do we model revenue in the new normal? Can we offset tuition increases? Is it possible to preserve the core from budget cuts? Will the function of multi-university systems change? This session combines presentation and discussion as participants think about the university system of the future. 

Presenter: Harold Hellenbrand, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, California State University Northridge 


Concurrent Session: The Red Balloon Journey—The Story of a College Embracing a Decision-making Strategy Driven by the Red Balloon Philosophy
The College of Education and Technology (COET) at Fort Hays State University has accepted the challenge of embracing the Red Balloon philosophy. A faculty driven Innovation Task Force has been created to inspire and nurture out-of-the-box initiatives in the College. Other institutions may be interested in the mechanisms that are being put in place to ensure a level of transparency and openness within the College. 

Presenters: Adam Holden, Coordinator, COET Innovation Task Force; and Lorie Cook-Benjamin, Assistant Professor of Teacher Education, Fort Hays State University, Kansas 


Concurrent Session: Leveraging the Red Balloon Initiative to Enhance Campus Collaboration and Innovation in the Face of Budget Cuts 
California State University, Fresno, leveraged AASCU’s Red Balloon (RB) Initiative to launch a campus-wide process for promoting innovation, even in the face of budget cuts. The RB Steering Committee Planning group launched the joint Academic Affairs and Senate Executive Committee campus effort in Fall 2010, and then charged Four Red Balloon Task Force discussion groups in the Spring to re-imagine higher education in the following areas: 1) Institutional Organization and Infrastructure; 2) Curriculum, Course and Instructional Redesign; 3) Faculty Workload; and 4) Enrollment Management. The resulting Red Balloon Task Force Report produced 40 recommendations that were reviewed and many that were approved by the President, Cabinet, Deans and others for future action. Presenters share successes, challenges, best practices and suggestions. Providing a forum to foster collaborative innovation proved beneficial in generating a climate and process for positive change, particularly valuable during a time of significant budget constraints. Attendees have the opportunity to review the recommendations, ask questions, and gain new insights in developing a platform for meaningful and progressive discussion, innovation and action on their campus. 

Presenters: William A. Covino, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Fresno; and Ellen Junn, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, San Jose State University, California 
 

Concurrent Session:  Cross-Generation Course Design—A Matrix for Reaching All of Today’s Students
Institutions of Higher Education are striving to demonstrate accountability to consumers and state legislatures while also meeting new expectations from today’s students. Based on a thorough review of the literature we suggest that societal changes, not generational differences, constitute the basis for teaching methods that reach a heterogeneous student body. We present a matrix of course design traits and discuss how these teaching methods:
• help retain underrepresented and first generation college students
• engage adult learners
• improve learning outcomes
Presenters discuss specific examples of course redesigns and show participants how to use the matrix to convert their own courses to CrossGen courses.

Presenters: Kristin G. Esterberg, Provost and Academic Vice President; Marc Boots-Ebenfield, Director, Center for Teaching Innovation; Anurag Jain, Assistant Professor, Marketing and Decision Sciences; and Daniel Mulcare, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Salem State University, MA


Concurrent Session: Using Undergraduate Research for Institutional Transformation 
SUNY Potsdam is in the fourth year of a five-year $1.6 million Title III Strengthening Institutions grant to integrate faculty-mentored undergraduate research throughout the curriculum. The project is noteworthy because it involves fostering interdisciplinary connections among curricula in arts, humanities, social sciences, sciences and education. Data about participation and sustainable curricular changes attest to the program’s success. The session shares the strategies that were used and discusses how the effort has already had positive effects on the culture of the campus and how we plan to sustain the program following the grant's end. 

Presenter: Margaret E. Madden, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, State University of New York, Potsdam 

 

Concurrent Session: The House Blend—Hybrid Learning Strategies and Methods
This session discusses strategies for designing blended learning courses. Participants are introduced to the Blended Learning Toolkit that has been developed as part of the UCF/AASCU Next Generation Learning Challenges Project, an initiative that involves 20 AASCU institutions. The presentation will also include an update on the progress of the Next Generation Learning Challenges UCF/AASCU Project.

Presenter: Thomas B. Cavanagh, Assistant Vice President, Center for Distributed Learning, University of Central Florida


Concurrent Session:  Try it! You’ll Like It! (or Maybe You Won’t, But Then We’ll Know How to Fix It): Pilot Test for a Simulation for Provosts
This is your opportunity to add your decision-making skills to the development of a computerized simulation of being a university provost. Utah Commissioner Bill Sederburg has created a successful computer-based simulation where groups of individuals play the role of a state legislator or college president. Bill Sederbur g and Liz Hitch (former Provost at two AASCU institutions) are altering the simulation for use by aspiring provosts. Join a small-group exercise using the simulation and provide critical feedback for applying the simulation to provost-type decisions. In the process, you might learn something about how you make decisions compared to your peers.

Presenters: William A. Sederburg, Commissioner and Elizabeth J. Hitch, Associate Commissioner for Academic Affairs, Utah System of Higher Education


2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. 
Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session:  Mobile Technology Re-imaginedIPFW's "Project #mobileEDU" 
This presentation demonstrates the transformative power of a faculty cohort, amounting to nearly 20% of our full-time faculty, when it is equipped with the latest in mobile technology and the infrastructure to support it. 

Presenters: William J. McKinney, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Joyce Lazier, Continuing Lecturer, Department of Philosophy; and Samantha Birk, Associate Director for Instructional Technologies, Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne
 

Concurrent Session: Using the National Repository of Online Courses to Increase the Effectiveness of Developmental Mathematics Instruction
Jacksonville State University has joined the National Repository of Online Courses Pilot Research Project for Arithmetic with the goal of improving the success rate of students who are under-prepared in mathematics. NROC resources are being used to transform existing traditional basic mathematics courses into hybrid courses. Data to be examined includes course completion rates, pass rates, and test scores. ACT and Compass scores are used to control for the initial level of competency of the students. Online interviews with NROC researchers are used to examine changes in the attitude, persistence and competence of students experiencing the environment. 

Presenter: Jan Case, Professor of Mathematics, Jacksonville State University, AL 
 

Concurrent Session: Leveraging Faculty Expertise to Advance College Initiatives 
In this session, participants learn about the variety of ways Metro State has used faculty expertise to implement important initiatives without hiring additional administrators, using the concept of Faculty Associate. Faculty Associates have been used for Assessment, to implement High Impact Practices such as service learning and undergraduate research, and for specific initiatives including the mentoring program and the new academic portfolio development process. Reassigned time or course release, with explicit titles and responsibilities, has facilitated faculty-to-faculty conversations about critical topics, while producing budget savings related to a reduced need for full-time administrators. The use of Faculty Associates provides professional development for the faculty members who have taken on these roles, and advancement of significant College initiatives. 

Presenters: Sheila S. Thompson, Associate Vice President and Mark Potter, Director, Center for Faculty Development, Metropolitan State College of Denver

Concurrent Session: Seeking the Presidency—Tactics and Strategies Part I
Presenter: Richard Rush, President, CSU Channel Islands


Concurrent Session: Try it! You’ll Like It! (or Maybe You Won’t, But Then We’ll Know How to Fix It): Pilot Test for a Simulation for Provosts
This is your opportunity to add your decision-making skills to the development of a computerized simulation of being a university provost. Utah Commissioner Bill Sederburg has created a successful computer-based simulation where groups of individuals play the role of a state legislator or college president. Bill Sederburg and Liz Hitch (former Provosts at two AASCU institutions) are altering the simulation for use by aspiring provosts. Join a small-group exercise using the simulation and provide critical feedback for applying the simulation to provost-type decisions. In the process, you might learn something about how you make decisions compared to your peers.
Presenters: Bill Sederburg, Commissioner and Elizabeth Hitch, Associate Commissioner for Academic Affairs, Utah System of Higher Education


3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Workshops 

Workshop: The Evolution of a Movement Orchestrating a Campus-Wide Learning-Centered Redesign Project 
From Academically Adrift to "Declining by Degrees," everywhere we turn the call for reform in higher education is loud and clear. The main issue seems to be a demand for improvement in student learning outcomes, and increasing evidence suggests a shift toward a learning-centered paradigm as an appropriate solution. As academic leaders we work with intelligent skeptics who are trained to think critically and therefore are not likely to accept new ideas without challenge. Using our experience at Dalton State College with a campus-wide course redesign initiative as an example, in this interactive session we combine critical components of the leadership and learning-centered literature with practice to demonstrate how academic leaders can make the case for change as well as create a receptive environment in which the seeds for change can take root. 

Presenters: Sandra S. Stone, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Christy Price, Professor of Psychology, Dalton State College, Georgia 

5 p.m. – 7 p.m. 
Closing Reception - sponsored by Rosetta Stone 


Sunday, February 12

7:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Provost to President Program

Fees top

Registration fee: $650
Registration Fee includes all program sessions and materials; opening reception on Thursday; breakfast on Friday; breakfast, lunch and closing reception on Saturday; and refreshments at all breaks. All chief academic officers are expected to register and pay the fee even if only participating in the program.

Team Member Registration Fee: $550
If you are a Provost and you want to bring a professional from your campus (Dean, Associate Provost, etc) we have created a special rate for your invitee. The Provost or primary representative from your campus is expected to pay the regular registration fee of $650 and the person attending at the invitation of the provost is eligible for the reduced fee of $550.

Spouse/Guest Registration Fee: $150
Includes opening reception on Thursday; breakfast on Friday; breakfast and closing reception on Saturday; and refreshments at all breaks.

Registration Information top

NOTE:  

More Registration Information

Provosts Online Registration
Register online
(Please note: If you do not know your password go to “retrieve your password”. If your email address isn’t recognized you will prompted to a screen where you can “create a new account”. Or you may register via the downloadable form below.)

Provosts register via the downloadable registration form, to be mailed or faxed
Download form (pdf)

Team Member Registration Form
Download form (pdf)

Provost to President Program
Register online
Download form (pdf)

Contact Felicia Durham at 202-478-4673 to register for this meeting.


Accommodations top

Hotel

JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country
23808 Resort Parkway
San Antonio, TX 78261
Telephone: 210-276-2500
Toll-free: 866-882-4420
Fax Number: 210-403-3452

Hotel accommodations for the 2012 Academic Affairs Winter Meeting can be booked directly with the hotel by calling 866-882-4420 and referring to the group rate for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities Academic Affairs Winter Meeting.

You may also reserve your room online https://resweb.passkey.com/go/SCUN 

Room Rate

The special conference rate is $220 for a single/double room plus 16.75% tax (current tax rate may change)
To obtain this rate, you must call the hotel by January 17, 2011.

Optional resort charge is $18 per night and includes the following: high-speed internet access; local/domestic long distance calls; golf bag storage; 20 % discount off golf retail; access to resort or spa fitness center (including fitness classes offered at Spa); two signature welcome drinks in 18 Oaks golf club; bicycle rental; 15% off meals in replenish spa bistro; tennis court access with racket, and bottled water in room.

Check-in at the hotel is at 4 p.m. and check-out is at 11 a.m.

Cancellation & Refund Policytop

Cancellation Fee: $150
If you must cancel your registration, you will receive a full refund if the cancellation is before 5 p.m. EST on Friday, February 3. There will be a $150 cancellation fee after that date. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis. Guest meals should be cancelled by 5 p.m. EST on Friday, February 3rd for a full refund; no refund is available after that date.

REGISTRATION ASSISTANCE

AASCU SUPPORTS

PROGRAM PARTNER


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PROVOST TO PRESIDENT PROGRAM SPONSOR


AALI


OPENING RECEPTION SPONSOR


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CLOSING RECEPTION SPONSOR


Rosetta Stone logo


LUNCH AND PLENARY SPONSOR


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HOTEL KEY CARD SPONSOR


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INTERNET SPONSOR


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POCKET GUIDE SPONSOR


ELS Educational Service


EXHIBITOR


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