• ADP National Meeting

    Thursday, June 2, 2011 to Saturday, June 4, 2011
    Orlando, Florida

    Beyond Voting: Active Citizenship in the New Era

    The theme of this year’s meeting, Beyond Voting: Active Citizenship in the New Era, poses the following set of questions: What does it mean to be an active citizen? How does online technology shape our citizenship behaviors? Are there generational differences in how we think about citizenship? What are key citizenship behaviors and skills that students should possess by the time they graduate? What are the signature pedagogies and practices that encourage students to become active citizens? During our meeting in Orlando, we will be exploring effective strategies to engage citizens in civic work.

    About the Conference

     The theme of this year’s meeting, Beyond Voting: Active Citizenship in the New Era, poses the following set of questions: What does it mean to be an active citizen? How does online technology shape our citizenship behaviors? Are there generational differences in how we think about citizenship? What are the key citizenship behaviors and skills that students should possess by the time they graduate? What are the signature pedagogies and practices that encourage students to become active citizens? During our meeting in Orlando, we will explore effective strategies to engage citizens in civic work with these questions in mind.

    The 2011 American Democracy Project National Meeting will host featured sessions, small and large workshops, a new “View from 30,000 Feet” series, spectacular keynote addresses, a Game of Politics Simulation, a National Issues Forum, and a robust set of concurrent sessions.

    We’ll begin with a series of pre-conference sessions on Thursday, June 2nd, featuring the work of our Civic Engagement in Action initiatives, including:

    1. 7 Revolutions
    2. America’s Future
    3. Civic Agency
    4. Deliberative Polling
    5. eCitizenship
    6. Political Engagement Project
    7. Stewardship of Public Lands

    The formal conference will kick off at 4:00 pm on Thursday with a special conversation led by three ADP leaders discussing Thoughts on Active Citizenship: We the Students, We the Faculty, and We the Administrators. This conversation will be followed by a set of small group discussions. We will end the first day with a networking reception and dinner. Friday and Saturday will be filled with a combination of remarks offered by Andrew Rosenthal of The New York Times and Erica Williams of the Center for American Progress, breakfast breakout sessions, featured and concurrent sessions, and we will conclude the conference with a Poolside Celebration on Saturday night.

    Please join us for a spectacular event which is designed to inform, engage, and inspire.


     

    The Democracy Commitment logo“The American Democracy Project is thrilled to welcome participants in The Democracy Commitment (TDC), an exciting new civic engagement initiative for community colleges. Throughout the ADP Meeting, TDC representatives will be presenting both with and to ADP representatives. We are planning to work closely with TDC as they launch this new initiative. For more information about the TDC, please visit this website.”

    Schedule top

    Thursday, June 2 
    9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Registration
    9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Pre-Conference Meetings for Civic Engagement in Action Series
    (invitation only)
    9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

    Educating Globally Competent Citizens: A Tool Kit for Teaching Seven Revolutions ($40 Registration – lunch included)

    7Revolutions logoThis day-long institute introduces participants to numerous tools for educating globally competent citizens. Representatives from eight AASCU campuses describe how they have integrated and infused the Seven Revolutions framework (population, resources, technology, information, economic integration, conflict, and governance) and content on their campuses for introductory, first year, major, and honors courses. Institute leaders will demonstrate the teaching materials and resources they have found most valuable in the courses they teach and will guide participants in anticipating how these same tools could be used effectively on their home campuses.

    To learn more about the 7 Revolutions, visit this website.

    12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Pre-Conference Workshops (open to all registrants)
     

    Game of Politics Simulation (free and open to all registrants)
    Sponsored by The New York Times 

    The Game of Politics Simulation is set 4-6 years in the future. Participants are assigned roles in the Presidency, Congress, the Supreme Court (including lawyers), and the media. Then they work on legislative, budgetary and judicial issues while facing multiple and multi-session story lines that cover:

    1) lobbying efforts (regarding legislative and budgetary matters);
    2) emerging domestic and foreign policy issues;
    3) constituency service matters;
    4) legislative and executive wildcards; and,
    5) plain old distractions.

    Past participants in the Simulation have gained a new respect for the task of governing as well as a much better understanding of how to influence the political process. For more information about the Game of Politics Simulation, visit this website.

    Please RSVP by emailing Don Jansiewicz by Sunday, May 16th.

    Facilitator: Don Jansiewicz, Creator, Game of Politics


    Getting Started with the Political Engagement Project (free and open to all registrants) 

    The Political Engagement Project (PEP) has the goal of developing a sense of political efficacy and duty on the part of undergraduates as well as a set of political skills that students will need as they engage with the political world. To do this, PEP campuses have infused political education and engagement tactics into a variety of disciplines and courses on campus and have made the tenants of political engagement central to the institutional framework of their campuses.

    This workshop explores the goals and pedagogies of the participating courses and programs, students’ perspectives on their experiences in the program, and the impact of these experiences on key dimensions of political development such as knowledge and understanding, active involvement, sense of political efficacy and identity, and skills of democratic participation. Learn how to launch PEP on your campus in this informative workshop.

    For more information about PEP, please visit this website.

    4 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    Opening Plenary: Thoughts on Active Citizenship: We the Students, We the Faculty, and We the Administrators 

    Moderator:
    Harry C. Boyte, Co-Director, Center for Democracy and Citizenship, MN

    Panelists:
    Paul Markham, Co-Director, The Institute for Citizenship and Social Responsibility, Western Kentucky University
    Emile C. Netzhammer, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Keene State College, NH

    5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.

    Seven Revolutions and The New York Times Knowledge Network Present - Theater and Global Change: A Live Web Session  

    Watch a live web session for the new Seven Revolutions course “Theater and Global Change” sponsored by the University of Minnesota Duluth and the New York Times Knowledge Network. The on-line course, offered through the Knowledge Network via the Epsilen Global Learning Management System, is a continuing education experience taught by UMD Professor William Payne and New York Times Theater Critic Ben Brantley. The live web session, one of five offered during the four-week course, will be delivered through the interactive Wimba Classroom and will feature Seven Revolutions Scholar and California State University-Fresno Psychology Professor Dr. Martin Shapiro. The discussion will focus on Global Trends in Artificial Intelligence, Biotechnology, and Theater as Futurism through the play R.U.R. by Karel Capek. Felice Nudelman of the New York Times will discuss the collaboration between The New York Times, the Center for Strategic International Studies, and AASCU institutions that has culminated in the growing momentum toward the use of the Seven Revolutions curriculum.

    Felice Nudelman, Director of Education, The New York Times
    William E. Payne, Interim Dean, School of Fine Arts, University of Minnesota Duluth

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Small Group Discussions
    6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m. Opening Dinner

    Friday, June 3 
    7:30 a.m. – 9 a.m. Breakfast
    7:30 a.m. – 9 a.m. Breakfast Breakouts
    8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Registration
    9 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

    Plenary Session 

    Presenter: Erica Williams, Deputy Director for Progress 2050, Center for American Progress, DC

    Erica Williams is the Deputy Director of Progress 2050, a project of the Center for American Progress that develops new ideas for an increasingly diverse America. The project seeks to build a progressive agenda that is more inclusive and reflects the rich racial and ethnic makeup of the nation. Progress 2050 does this by promoting innovative policy ideas, facilitating honest dialogue about the intersection of race and policy, analyzing demographics, and developing new leaders.

    To read more about Erica, please visit this website.

    10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Refreshment Break
    10:45 a.m. – Noon Concurrent Sessions
    Noon – 1:30 p.m. Lunch on your Own
    1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

    We the People National Issues Forum: Part 1
    (RSVP Required. To RSVP, please email Cecilia M. Orphan)

    This two-part workshop examines deliberation over shared concerns as integral to the public work of strengthening democracy.  Participants experience a deliberative forum using National Issues Forum logoNational Issues Forums materials, learn skills relevant to convening and participating in deliberative forums, and participate in research leading to a new National Issues Forums guide on democracy that is being developed in collaboration with We the People for use on ADP campuses and educational and community groups around the country.  Experienced forum moderators lead these highly interactive sessions.

    National Issues Forum 

    Part I begins with a deliberative forum using a current NIF guide on What Should Go on the Internet:  Privacy, Freedom and Security. Following the forum participants explore key concepts such as: options, trade-offs, consequences, and choice work; and the workshop raises questions related to convening and leading forums and how deliberative decision making can lead to action.

    NIF Organizers:
    Cristina Alfaro, Professor, School of Education, San Diego State University and National Issues Forums Institute (NIFI) Board Member
    John Dedrick, Vice President and Program Director, Kettering Foundation
    Elizabeth Gish, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard School of Divinity
    Scott London, Independent radio producer, Journalist, and Forum Convener
    Bill Muse, President, NIFI
    Gary Paul, Professor, Department of History and Political Science, Florida A&M and NIFI Board Member

    1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Featured Sessions: Block 1 
     

    The Need for Civility and A New Approach to Public Policy Problem-Solving 

    There are currently two billion people online around the world. With the growth of social networking sites and the increase of online participants, instances of online hostility have grown not just in frequency but also in severity. Online hostility has become a social epidemic and the negative effects on its victims are extreme. This is not acceptable, and we as a global community need to draw a strict line in the sand and say enough is enough.

    This session will outline the extent of the problem, address the emotional, physical and reputational effects on victims, talk about why the unique culture of college-age students makes them particularly vulnerable, and discuss what can be done to create a healthy online environment where everyone can fully engage and contribute without fear or threat of being the target of unwarranted abuse, harassment, or lies.

    Presenter: Andrea Weckerle, Founder, CiviliNation

     

    Strengthening Local Democracy Through Civic Engagement : Active Citizenship in Eau Claire, WI 

    The presentation reviews the civic engagement model and process used to train citizens to do public work and to strengthen democracy within the greater Eau Claire community. Key results and lessons learned in implementing the civic engagement model are shared.

    Presenters:   Mike Huggins, Eau Claire City Manager, Tom McCarty, Eau Claire County Administrator and Don Mowry, Director, Center for Service Learning, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
     

    Developing Democracy’s Hubs: Campus Centers and Institutes as Critical Resources for Passionate Impartiality 

    As the deliberative democracy movement continues to expand, a number of centers and institutes have developed at our colleges and universities across the country that are dedicated to serving as critical impartial conveners and facilitators for their local communities. Such sources of “passionate impartiality” are increasingly essential to a high functioning democracy. Martín Carcasson founded the CSU Center for Public Deliberation (CPD) in the fall of 2005, and continues to serve as the director.  The CPD relies heavily on the work of student associates that earn class credit while being trained as deliberative practitioners, and who then work on a wide variety of local projects focused on improving the quality of public discussion and building capacity for community problem solving. He discusses what brought him to the work, his experiences of developing the center and working with the students, and the future role for “democracy’s hubs” like the CPD in our democracy and our campuses.

    Presenter: Martín Carcasson, Director, Center for Public Deliberation, Colorado State University

    Read this article by Martín as background for his featured session.

     

    The Democracy Commitment 

    The Democracy Commitment, modeled after the American Democracy Project, is a national initiative that will provide a national platform for the development and expansion of programs and projects aiming at engaging community college students in civic learning and democratic practice. The goal of the partnership is that every graduate of an American community college shall have had an education in democracy. This includes all of our students, whether they aim to transfer to university, achieve an associate degree or obtain a certificate.

    Presenter:  Brian Murphy, President, De Anza Community College

    For more information about The Democracy Commitment, please visit this website.
    3:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. Refreshment Break 
    4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions  

    Saturday, June 4 
    7 a.m. – 5 p.m. Registration
    7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Breakfast
    7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Breakfast Breakouts
    8:45 a.m. – 10 a.m.

    Plenary Session 

    Presenter:  Russell Dalton, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Irvine

    Russell Dalton is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine and was the founding director of the Center for the Study of Democracy at UC Irvine. He has received a Fulbright Professorship at the University of Mannheim, a Barbra Streisand Center fellowship, German Marshall Research Fellowship and a POSCO Fellowship at the East/West Center. His recent publications have focused on youth and politics:  The Good Citizen: How the Young are Transforming American Politics (2009) and editor of the Engaging Youth in Politics: Debating Democracy's Future (2011). In addition, he has authored or edited 20 books and almost 150 academic articles on public opinion, political behavior, and political parties.

    Read this article by Russell Dalton as background for his session

    10 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Refreshment Break
    10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

    We the People National Issues Forum: Parts 2 and 3 

    Part II introduces naming and framing issues for public deliberation.  The session will begin by “deconstructing” the issue guide used in yesterday’s forum to highlight critical issue framing principles.  Participants will then identify their concerns about the role of citizens in democracy—We the People—and they will develop a tentative framing for a new National Issues Forums guide.

    Part II continues over lunch (provided for registered participants) with a discussion about identifying opportunities to organize forums on ADP campuses.

    NIF Organizers: 
    Cristina Alfaro, Professor, School of Education, San Diego State University and NIFI Board Member
    John Dedrick, Vice President and Program Director, Kettering Foundation
    Elizabeth Gish, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard School of Divinity
    Scott London, Independent radio producer, Journalist, and Forum Convener
    Bill Muse, President, National Issues Forums Institute
    Gary Paul, Professor, Department of History and Political Science, Florida A&M and NIFI Board Member

    10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Concurrent Sessions 
    Noon – 1:30 p.m. Featured Sessions: Block 2 (Boxed Lunch Provided) 
     

    Interactive Townhall on Student Engagement 

    Unlike a political townhall, this is an interactive, problem-solving session.  Participants co-create and share various models for engaging students in deeper conversations on campus.  The first phase of the session consists of small-group discussions about obstacles, and the second phase of the session will consist of small-group discussions about resources and potential solutions.  Participants can expect to share effective practices with each other and to explore partnerships that span multiple institutions.

    Presenter:  Lucas Cioffi, CEO, Athena Bridge, Inc.
     

    Happiness Initiatives: A New Model For Citizen and Student Engagement 

    Happiness science is hot these days.  Models like the Seattle Area
    Happiness Initiative can help students understand what they need and want from life, and how they can work with others to achieve loftier goals than money and acquiring “stuff.”  Learn how this exciting new project from Sustainable Seattle helps students explore the deeper meanings of work and life and draws them into engaged citizenship.

    Presenter:  John de Graaf, Author, Affluenza: The All-Consuming Epidemic, and  Executive Director of Take Back Your Time
     

    Strategies for Re-imagining Undergraduate Education: Preserving a Civic Engagement Agenda While Addressing the Forces Affecting Higher Education 

    If the goal of the Red Balloon Project is to re-imagine undergraduate education, the immediate question becomes "What are we re-imagining undergraduate education for?" Answering the "what for" is perhaps the most important part of our work. In this roundtable discussion, we explore ways to focus our re-structuring and re-thinking on citizenship preparation, and by doing so, protect higher education's most important public purpose: the maintenance and improvement of American democracy.

    Presenter:  George L. Mehaffy, Vice President, Academic Leadership and Change, AASCU   

    For more information about the Red Balloon Project, please visit this website.  
     

    Civic Health in the “New Normal” 

    In collaboration with our ADP campus partners, NCoC will explore the challenges and opportunities in mobilizing their civic potential given today’s systemic economic crisis. As an open topic for consideration, it would be our aim to elevate the current dialogue to give education leaders and civic engagement practitioner’s new insights to the challenges they face within their respective campus communities.

    Presenters:  Kristen Cambell, Director, Programs and New Media, National Conference on Citizenship, DC
    Patricia Loughlin, Associate Professor of History, University of Central Oklahoma

    Michael Stout, Assistant Professor of Sociology Anthropology and Criminology, Missouri State University
    1:45 p.m. – 3 p.m. Concurrent Sessions 
    3 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Refreshment Break 
    3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. Concurrent Sessions 

    5 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

    Closing Remarks 

    Presenter:  Andrew Rosenthal, Editorial Page Editor, The New York Times 

    Andrew M. Rosenthal was named editorial page editor of The New York Times effective January 2007.  Mr. Rosenthal had been deputy editorial page editor of The New York Times since August 2003.  Before that, Mr. Rosenthal had been assistant managing editor since September 2001 and foreign editor since May 1997.  He also served as national editor of The Times for six months in 2000, supervising coverage of the presidential elections and the post-election day recount.

    To read articles written by Andrew, please visit this website.  
    6 p.m. – 8 p.m. Closing Reception 

    Fees top

    Fee includes all program sessions and materials; Opening Dinner on Thursday; Breakfast vouchers on Thursday and Friday; Lunch on Friday; refreshment breaks throughout the meeting; and Closing Reception on Saturday night. All meeting attendees, including presenters, are expected to pay the conference registration fee.

    All meeting attendees, including presenters, are expected to pay the conference registration fee.

     

    Registration Information:

    Please select among the three options below.

     

    Register online using AASCU’s new registration system.(Available to AASCU members or anyone who has attended the ADP Meeting in the past). 

    Register Online   
    Register via the downloadable registration form, to be mailed or faxed in. (Available to all registrants, butrequired for those who are not an AASCU member or who have never attended the ADP Meeting in the past). Download Form (pdf)
    Contact Felicia Durham at 202-478-4673 to register for this meeting.  


     

    Registration Type  Fee 
    AASCU Member and Community College Member Individual Rate (Rate for a single representative from a campus) $545
    AASCU Member and Community College Team Rate (Per person rate for two or more representatives from the same campus) $485
    Non-Member Individual Rate  $625
    All Students (Rate for a student currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate program) $360
    Guest* (Rate for a guest registrant that covers food and drinks during the opening reception) $125

    *A separate invoice will be sent for guests. Included in the guest registration fee are food and drinks during the opening reception, Breakfast on Friday and Saturday, and the Closing Reception.

    Please note: the guest registration fee does not include admittance to the concurrent, featured, or plenary sessions.


    Accommodations top

    Hotel

    Renaissance Orlando Hotel at Sea World
    6677 Sea Harbor Drive
    Orlando, FL 32821 US
    Tel: 407-351-5555
    Toll-free: 800-327-6677
    Fax: 407-351-9991

    Hotel Reservation

    Hotel accommodations for the 2011 American Democracy Project National Meeting can be booked directly with the hotel by calling 1-800-836-7610 and referring to the group rate for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project National Meeting

    You may also reserve your room online 

    Room Rates

    The special conference rate is $139 for a single/double room plus 12.5% tax (current tax rate may change)

    To obtain this rate, you must call the hotel by Monday, May 16. 

    Cancellation Policy

    If you must cancel your registration, you will receive a full refund if the cancellation is before 5 p.m. EST on Friday, May 27. There will be a $150 cancellation fee after that date. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis.

    Guest meals should be cancelled by 5 p.m. EST on Friday, May 27 for a full refund; no refund is available after that date.

    Cancellation & Refund Policytop

     If you must cancel your registration, you will receive a full refund if the cancellation is before 5 p.m. on Friday, June 5th. Cancellation after that time will result in a partial refund; the balance will pay for meals already ordered. Special circumstances will be handled on an individual basis.
    • Guest meals should be cancelled by 5 p.m. on Friday, May 27th, 2011, for a full refund; no refund is available after that date.
    • It is important to register with AASCU; you will receive an invoice.